politics

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University Psychology Exam Asked Students to Assess Politicians From TV

Psychology exam paper

Today, I received a copy of the psychology exam for the masters in neurology and psychiatry at Ain Shams university. The students were given this brief essay question "You are asked to assess the thinking of a famous politician through watching him in TV show. Discuss briefly the standards you will look for during your assessments." (see photo above Q3.B)

Psychiatry, politics and propaganda

I wrote an article for Mada on the unethical practice of diagnosing politicians from a distance.

Psychiatrist Mostafa Hussein writes about the dangers of asking renowned psychiatrists to profile politicians, political groups and society at large on television shows.

Sharing my depressing thoughts on Egypt

I am slowly developing an apathy towards the current political process. Not sure if future elections are meaningful.

There are no credible politicians left. Maybe few untainted ones exist but they hardly can be popular enough to win seats in any elections, either because they represent fringe ideology or have been smeared by everyone in power.

The postpone elections argument is similar to

Egypt is going to introduce nationwide cricket clubs. They are going to postpone all games until the teams are strong enough. Fans are expected to back clubs before they play any game. Before seeing how exciting the game is or which team has the better players.

That's why expecting us to back political parties and join them before they perform in parliament is rubbish.

Post-Jan25 in Minya

Since I am currently unemployed and wasting my time following the thousand or so tweets that appear every hour on my twitter account. I decided to spend time with my father getting paperwork related to several court cases done. These cases happen to be in Minya and they are related to few areas of land he refuses to give up.

The first post-Jan25 change noticeable is that in almost all villages you can see murals and graffiti honouring the martyrs and the youth of the revolution. The other thing, are the remains of illegal building on agricultural land, appearing as heap of broken down fresh white bricks in the middle of the green areas.

In the city of Minya, there are more visible signs of the state we are in. Empty hotels, intricate murals in English and Arabic about freedom, the martyrs and Egypt in all colours, army in front of government buildings, paid ads about the revolution asking people to say no to vandalism and one of the main squares in the city renamed from Midan Suzan Mubarak to Midan Shohada2(martyrs) 25 Jan. Probably renamed by the same governor who earlier renamed half of the city to Suzan Mubarak. Minya is the birthplace of the former first lady.

Otherwise, Minya didn't change much and what we've lived through in the past 3 months was mostly watched on TV. Except perhaps on the Jan 28th, I saw an armoured CSF vehicle with hundreds of tiny dents on it's body from stone throwing. Interestingly, the constant threat of thug attacks was very limited or unfelt.

What was more interesting is spending an afternoon discussing politics with people in the village of Rehana. Here is a quick summary in bullet points:

  1. Village men, some illiterate, understand politics more than people in Cairo expect them to be.
  2. Anyone affiliated to NDP and surprisingly the Muslim Brotherhood now have very little popularity.

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